New Book: Exalted (And a Goodreads Giveaway!)

My newest book, Exalted, is finally finished and ready to head to publication. This book has been a pet project for the last few weeks as something to keep the writing flowing. There have been considerable changes in my life and time to sit and write isn't something I have as much of anymore. The back cover reads: [su_quote]Explore the seven deadly sins as told through modern situations. Each story follows unpleasant circumstances we’ve all been subjected to, either in person or by recollection of another. Step into a relationship or a heated moment and ask yourself where you would have ended up. The answer might surprise you.[/su_quote] This novella is split into seven parts, with each sin getting its own story. These stories are not for the faint of heart and include subject matter that may be distressing to some readers, including domestic violence, addiction, and murder. Those of you familiar with my other works will know what to expect with this release. With the success of my last giveaway, there is a current Goodreads giveaway for this title which you can see by heading over here. (I'll also include it at the bottom of the post.) It starts on the 16th and runs to the 24th. Go ahead and bookmark it so you can get entered, there are three copies up for grabs. As always, thanks for reading and sharing. Goodreads Book Giveaway Exalted by Roy Miller Giveaway ends May 24, 2017. See the giveaway details at Goodreads. Enter…

Free Books Giveaway!

I'm running a contest for some free books! This giveaway begins Tuesday, April 25th at 12:00 AM and will continue until Tuesday, May 2nd at 12:00 AM. At the end of the week-long signup window the winner will be chosen at random and they will receive: Single, signed copies of all three of my currently published books. Printed manuscript of an unreleased story from my early days. A few business cards and a luxury postcard featuring my first publication. A donation to The Dougy Center in your name, with a printed receipt. Assorted goodies. Of course, as with any contest that provides physical prizes, you must be able and willing to provide a valid shipping address to receive the winnings. Unfortunately, this first contest will only be open to those in the continental US, but I'm hoping to make the next one international. Subscribe to the mailing list to unlock the entry form below! a Rafflecopter giveaway

A Note on Plagiarism

I received an extremely rude email from one 'Jonny Diamond' at LitHub today, telling me to "stop posting full articles from LitHub.com without any attribution or credit." On top of that, he says, "Beyond any legal ramifications, it's just a really shitty thing to do." That definitely rubs me the wrong way, and it needs to be addressed. My site runs with a plugin called WP-Auto, where you input RSS feeds and it'll automatically make new posts when new items show up on the feed. These posts are made as-is, with no editing done whatsoever from the original content in the feed. Content links are left intact and any footers that mention the author or other websites are included. I've included several sources from The NY Times and the Boston Globe among others. Furthermore, every post that I didn't write myself has a source link on the bottom. If he would have taken two seconds to look, he would have noticed that. The About page also states that I don't claim ownership of any article that I don't write, and if a copyright claim comes up for any reason (unauthorized use of a purchased stock image for example) I comply with any takedown requests. A little bit of professionalism goes a long way. I've covered my bases and I try very hard to make sure that anyone that creates anything in any way is fully sourced and noticed for their work. Writing is an extremely difficult business to make it…

FurtiveDalliance: A News Aggregator

For those of you that are looking to follow some independent news outlets that are trustworthy and have good reputations, I've collected some of them and added them to an aggregator. Posts are kept for 10 days. Feeds from Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting, The Anti-Media, The Free Thought Project, It's Going Down, Mint Press News, The Fifth Column / Podcast and CommonDreams are included. Visit http://furtivedalliance.co.

Oh, hey.

So I haven't been around in a while and the site was down for a bit, but I've recently rectified the latter and will work on the former again shortly. Maybe I'll get inspired again when it snows.

Market Saturation & You

I've never had anyone give me a satisfactory answer to this question in my regular Facebook dealings, so I'm going to present it openly for anyone that would like to try. One of the most common things people say when it comes to entry-level jobs is that they're made for teenagers. It's also something to do while you go to college and figure out how to pursue your career path. Whenever someone mentions how those jobs are low-paying and high stress, the former person will say, "get a better job. Go to school, learn a trade, better yourself." Sure, okay. That's a whole nother conversation in itself, but for the scope of this post my question is about market saturation and will be presented as a hypothetical scenario. If you take 100 people right now, you'll most likely have a pretty good mix of work. I'm just going to throw out some numbers for the sake of the scenario and say that maybe half work entry-level jobs such as food service, hospitality, and retail. 20 work office jobs at the base level. 10 work office jobs at an executive level. 5 are small business owners, and 5 are corporate CEOs. In this scenario, pay will stretch from around minimum wage hourly ($7.15 federal) to millions per year salary. Think of this as the situation we have now. A good mix of workers in different areas, different levels of pay and a (somewhat) median cost of living in between. Now, consider…

What Are We Mad About, Again?

Ebola came out of nowhere and exploded in the media, and then it disappeared overnight. Then Zika popped up, and that has disappeared as well. Brock Turner was a hot topic for a couple weeks, and then, you guessed it, he vanished. Ryan Lochte was the talk of the town for a little while, but then his fire died down to make way for Colin Kaepernick. (Let me not forget to mention that Feminist garbage heap Jezebel wrote an article about how sexy he is while shitting on him the whole time. Hooray, feminism?) So, what are we mad about today? Actually, there are two things: The DEA is starting a new war against Kratom. From the linked article: Kratom is made from the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa, a Southeast Asian tree related to coffee, and has been consumed in Asia for millennia, typically as a tea or powder. The herb contains alkaloids that appear to activate opioid receptors in the brain and reduce pain. Although most opioids have sedative qualities, low to moderate doses of kratom serve as a mild stimulant. Kratom has been used by a lot of people for everything from analgesia to anxiety maintenance, and more recently as a tool to help combat opiate withdrawal symptoms. Of course, if there are fewer people using drugs the DEA won't have anything to make money off of, so that can't happen. Kratom has also been used recreationally as a mood elevator, and we can't have that, either. Happy people…

Seven Day Story: Conclusion

Marcus Colvin for BBTV 7, Brantleberry In the early morning hours of Tuesday the fourteenth, the body of a missing cave diver was discovered about forty miles north of Exit 87. Caleb Dorne of Brantleberry was out on a solo survival hike when the worst of the worst happened; a troublesome encounter with nature ended in a broken leg. We recently visited Dorne's home and spoke with his girlfriend, Siobhan Clemens, about how things will change for her in the wake of this tragedy. As we made our way to the home neighbors waved cheerfully and kids shouted and played without worry. It never seems to get less unsettling that the world around us can be so utterly unknowing and carefree when one person's existence has been shattered just next door. We were invited in by a somber-yet-smiling woman who looked as if she had been interrupted while trying to sleep. She led us quietly into a sitting room with a sectional couch and two recliners of muted colors, and as we sat she retreated into the kitchen to grab drinks. A quick glance showed a familiar scene of family photos and nice end table ornaments, but nothing kid-related. "I always expected him to come home when he left," she starts. She sat glasses of water on the table in front of us before sitting down. She kept her eyes down on the floor as they welled with tears. "He had gone out dozens of times and always came back…